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Showing posts from March, 2014

In Love Unraveled

Inspired by "Tonight I Can Write The Saddest Lines" of Pablo Neruda (a favorite of mine) and a blog post by Don Tuite of Electronic Design ("Engineers Who Write (For a Living)), I've composed the poem below.



The Moment of a Lifetime

One bright July Morning,
I sat in a pensive stare,
Filled with troubled feelings,
Perhaps more than I could bear.

The birds outside chirped in blight,
Ignorant of life's afflictions,
But little did I know that tonight,
My dreams would change direction.

As sudden as a shooting star,
That grants one's deepest desires,
Something caught my eye from afar,
That would set my heart on fire.

There she was the daughter of Venus,
Envied by her own mother,
For hers were the hearts of countless men,
Hers until a time no one knew when.

Then,
I made a wish to the keeper of time,
A foolish wish made by a man in love,
To freeze that moment, that second forever,
To dream that we were happily together.

Another moment passed,
A wish in vain,
More…

Fast Facts: Differential Equations Unraveled

There has always been some petty difficulty in grasping the intuitive idea of a differential equation, maybe due to the endeavor required in deriving the implication of such or due to the analysis required in arriving at the solution (which can't be easily visualized for a beginner). Thus, in this text I will attempt to explain it in as conceptual an approach can be (but I won't cover technicalities like how to arrive at a solution given this kind of differential equation because any standard textbook can do that).



To begin with, I shall review the basic meaning of a differential:

d/dx - RATE OF CHANGE

d2/dx2 - RATE OF CHANGE OF THE RATE OF CHANGE



    Naturally, we aren't very much concerned with the higher derivatives if we are still new to the topic because they represent the rate of change of the rate of change of the rate of change of the rate of change, ... of some characteristic of a system. And if it existed, i.e. the higher order differentials were non-zero, …